Sky Blue
Wassily Kandinsky
Sky Blue
Wassily Kandinsky (Russian; Abstract Art; 1866-1944): Sky Blue (Bleu de ciel), March 1940. Oil on canvas, 100 x 73 cm (39-5/16 x 28-3/4 inches). Musée National d'art Moderne, Centre Pompidou, Paris, France. © 2009 Artist Rights Society (ARS), New York/ADAGP, Paris. Photo: Philippe Migeat, courtesy Collection Centre Pompidou, Paris, diffusion RM. © This artwork may be protected by copyright. It is posted on the site in accordance with fair use principles.



'… lend your ears to music, open your eyes to painting, and … stop thinking! Just ask yourself whether the work has enabled you to “walk about" into a hitherto unknown world. If the answer is yes, what more do you want?' (Wassily Kandinsky)



'Wassily Kandinsky’s thoughtful explorations and intellectual roots of art, and his search for abstract means to express them, revolutionized art in the early twentieth century. Writing in 1943, Marcel Duchamp saw Kandinsky’s late work as “a clear transfer of thought on canvas." With this observation, he conveyed his understanding of Kandinsky’s reformulation of pictorial space into a pure white plane upon which hover signs and symbols. By contrast, Kandinsky’s friend Jean Arp saw in his late work an affirmation of life and of growth: “His work is aglow with spiritual reality… Things blossom, sparkle, ripple in his paintings and poems. They speak of old blood and young stones."' (© The Phillips Collection)