Monthly Archives: July, 2016

Tom Wesselmann

“I find sometimes I get so excited working, especially when starting new ideas; I get so excited that I get uncomfortable. It almost feels dangerous, like I’m flirting with something dangerous.” (Tom Wesselmann)

Group Exhibition including, among others, Tom Wassermann, Andy Warhol and Alex Katz:

“Girls, Girls, Girls”
Focusing on the female form in Pop
June 4 – August 4, 2016
Vertu Fine Art, Boca Raton, Florida

Tom Wesselmann’s gorgeous works are perfect for the season. From his 1960s “Great American Nude” series to his late career “Sunset Nudes” series, potent imagery and colors resonate with hot summer days, picnics, beaches, sunsets and — girls. The good life! Big and bold neon canvases are easily among the most appealing of figurative art ever created. His is a different take on the classic female nude that is at once compelling, immediate and celebratory. Wesselmann’s contagious enthusiasm is pure visual joy.

— Jules Cavanaugh


Featured image above: Tom Wesselmann (American, 1931-2004): Sunset Nude with Big Palm Tree, 2004. Oil on canvas, 105 x 128 inches (266.7 x 325.1 cm). Mitchell-Innes & Nash, New York, NY, USA. © Estate of Tom Wesselmann / SODRAC, Montreal / VAGA, New York. 

(Click on any image to begin slideshow.)


© 2016 I Require Art Studios, LLC. All Rights Reserved.

“Painters’ Paintings: From Freud to Van Dyck,” The National Gallery, London

Lucian Freud (1922-2011): “Self-Portrait: Reflection,” 2002. 

“Painters’ Paintings: From Freud to Van Dyck”
June 23 – September 4, 2016
The National Gallery, London

The concept of Painters’ Paintings intrigues. Who did the painters, the masters, themselves admire, or more specifically, collect — and why? As with most collectors, the reasons were various. Among them, artworks were received as gifts (Picasso to Matisse), or bought to help a fellow artist financially (Degas often assisted fellow artists in this manner), or often, acquired for the sheer love or passion for the artwork. The National Gallery, London, organized a fascinating show based on this concept which runs through September 4th. This exhibition of over eighty works, spans five hundred years and includes pieces collected by Freud, Matisse, Degas, Leighton, Watts, Lawrence, Reynolds, and Van Dyck. Surely, an insightful and engaging show of masterful works and masterful collecting.

— Jules Cavanaugh

Edgar Degas (1834–1917): Combing the Hair (‘La Coiffure’), c. 1896. Photograph: The National Gallery, London.

Edgar Degas (1834–1917): Combing the Hair (‘La Coiffure’), c. 1896. Photograph: The National Gallery, London. Formerly, Collection of Henri Matisse.

Paul Cézanne (1839–1906): Bather with Outstretched Arm (study), 1883-1885. Photograph: Dorothy Zeiden. Collection of Jasper Johns, formerly in the Collection of Edgar Degas.

Paul Cézanne (1839–1906): Bather with Outstretched Arm (study), 1883-1885. Photograph: Dorothy Zeiden. Collection of Jasper Johns, formerly in the Collection of Edgar Degas.


© 2016 I Require Art Studios, LLC. All Rights Reserved.

Vincent van Gogh’s Ear

Vincent van Gogh (Dutch, 1853-1890): Self-Portrait with Bandaged Ear, 1889. Created in Arles, France. Oil on canvas, 51 x 45 cm. Private Collection.

Then again, he might not have cut off most of his left ear.

So say two German art historians, Hans Kaufmann and Rita Wildegans,* who argue that Paul Gauguin, not Vincent, sliced off most of van Gogh’s ear with a rapier, either in anger or self-defense, perhaps accidentally, in a heated disagreement. Speculation supporting the official tale of Vincent slicing off most of the ear in a fit of madness and then presenting it to a prostitute, is as debatable as the version of Gauguin doing the deed.

Following ten years of researching police reports, letters and other biographical material, the historians concluded that in order to keep Gauguin out of jail and in an attempt for Vincent to maintain the friendship, the two artists conspired to a crime cover-up and to remain quiet about the incident for the remainder of their lives — in a “pact of silence.”  They report that at the time of the incident: Vincent was not yet mad, but only experienced seizures. No one witnessed the actual event. Vincent van Gogh had a strong infatuation with Gauguin. And there were references by each of the artists suggesting a complexity beyond the official story. Commonly reported, the first letter from van Gogh to Gauguin following the incident included, “I will keep quiet about this and so will you.” Years later, in a letter from Gauguin referencing van Gogh, “A man with sealed lips, I cannot complain about him.”

Whatever the facts of the tragic event on the night of December 23, 1888, nine wondrous weeks ended of two masters producing works of art that proved pivotal in the course of the development of modern art.

— Jules Cavanaugh

* “Van Goghs Ohr: Paul Gauguin und der Pakt des Schweigens ” (Van Gogh’s Ear: Paul Gauguin and the Pact of Silence) by Hans Kaufmann and Rita Wildegans, Osburg, 2008.

Vincent van Gogh (Dutch, Post-Impressionism, 1853-1890): Self Portrait with Palette, 1889. Created in Arles, France. Oil on canvas, 57 x 43.5 cm. Private Collection

Vincent van Gogh (Dutch, 1853-1890): Self Portrait with Palette, 1889. Created in Arles, France. Oil on canvas, 57 x 43.5 cm. Private Collection

Vincent van Gogh (Dutch, Post-Impressionism, 1853-1890): Paul Gauguin (Man in a Red Beret), 1888. Oil on canvas, 37 x 33 cm. Van Gogh Museum, Amsterdam, Netherlands.

Vincent van Gogh (Dutch, 1853-1890): Paul Gauguin (Man in a Red Beret), 1888. Oil on canvas, 37 x 33 cm. Van Gogh Museum, Amsterdam, Netherlands.

Vincent van Gogh (Dutch, Post-Impressionism, 1853-1890): Self-Portrait with Straw Hat, Summer 1887. Oil on artist board, mounted to wood panel; 34.9 × 26.7 cm (13-3/4 x 10-1/2 inches). Detroit Institute of Arts, Michigan, USA.

Vincent van Gogh (Dutch, 1853-1890): Self-Portrait with Straw Hat, Summer 1887. Oil on artist board, mounted to wood panel; 34.9 × 26.7 cm (13-3/4 x 10-1/2 inches). Detroit Institute of Arts, Michigan, USA.

Vincent van Gogh (Dutch, Post-Impressionism, 1853-1890): Self-Portrait with Bandaged Ear, 1889. Oil on canvas, 60.5 x 50 cm. The Courtauld Gallery, London, UK.

Vincent van Gogh (Dutch, 1853-1890): Self-Portrait with Bandaged Ear, 1889. Oil on canvas, 60.5 x 50 cm. The Courtauld Gallery, London, UK.

Vincent van Gogh (Dutch, 1853-1890): Portrait of Doctor Paul Gachet, 1890. Auvers-sur-oise, France. Oil on canvas, 67 x 56 cm (26.4 x 22 inches). Private Collection.

“I’ve done the portrait of M. Gachet with a melancholy expression, which might well seem like a grimace to those who see it… Sad but gentle, yet clear and intelligent, that is how many portraits ought to be done… There are modern heads that may be looked at for a long time, and that may perhaps be looked back on with longing a hundred years later.” (Vincent van Gogh, letter to Theo)


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“Women of Abstract Expressionism” at the Denver Art Museum

Helen Frankenthaler (1928 –2011): Nature Abhors a Vacuum, 1973. Acrylic on canvas, 103-1/2 x 112-1/2 inches (262.9 x 285.8 cm). National Gallery of Art, Washington, D.C., USA. © Helen Frankenthaler Foundation, Inc.

“My pictures are full of climates, abstract climates. They’re not nature per se, but a feeling.” (Helen Frankenthaler)

 

“Women of Abstract Expressionism”
June 12 – September 25, 2016
Denver Art Museum, Denver, Colorado

 

Too often, female artists are overlooked in art history, frequently overshadowed by their male counterparts. This show goes a long way to remedy some of this oversight. Women of Abstract Expressionism is the first Exhibition to present, at the same time, twelve of these remarkable female Abstract Expressionist artists. Over fifty major works are included — the artists: Mary Abbott, Jay DeFeo, Perle Fine, Helen Frankenthaler, Sonia Gechtoff, Judith Godwin, Grace Hartigan, Elaine de Kooning, Lee Krasner, Joan Mitchell, Deborah Remington, and Ethel Schwabacher. All of these artists worked during the 1940s-50s, on both the East and West Coasts, and produced some of the most exciting Abstract Expressionist works ever created.

Following the Denver Art Museum, the exhibition will travel to the Mint Museum, Charlotte, in October 2016 and the Palm Springs Art Museum in February 2017.

— Jules Cavanaugh

Joan Mitchell (American, 1926-1992): Untitled, 1957. Oil on canvas, 27 x 57-1/2 inches (68.6 x 146.1 cm). Edward Tyler Nahem Fine Art, LLC, New York, NY, USA.

Joan Mitchell (1926-1992): Untitled, 1957. Oil on canvas, 27 x 57-1/2 inches (68.6 x 146.1 cm). Edward Tyler Nahem Fine Art, LLC, New York, NY, USA.

Helen Frankenthaler (American; Abstract Expressionism, Lyrical Abstraction; 1928 –2011): Western Dream, 1957. Oil on canvas, 70 x 86 inches  (177.8 x 218.4 cm). Gagosian Gallery, New York, NY, USA. © Estate of Helen Frankenthaler/Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York.

Helen Frankenthaler (1928–2011): Western Dream, 1957. Oil on canvas, 70 x 86 inches (177.8 x 218.4 cm). Gagosian Gallery, New York, NY, USA. © Estate of Helen Frankenthaler/Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York.

Elaine de Kooning (American, Abstract Expressionist, 1918–1989): Bullfight, 1959. Oil on canvas; 77-5/8 x 131-1/4 x 1-1/8 inches. Denver Art Museum, Denver, Colorado, USA. © Elaine de Kooning Trust.

Elaine de Kooning (1918–1989): Bullfight, 1959. Oil on canvas; 77-5/8 x 131-1/4 x 1-1/8 inches. Denver Art Museum, Denver, Colorado, USA. © Elaine de Kooning Trust.

Helen Frankenthaler (American; Abstract Expressionism, Lyrical Abstraction; 1928 –2011): Elberta, 1975. Acrylic on canvas, 79 x 97 inches. Private Collection. © Helen Frankenthaler Foundation, Inc. / Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York.

Helen Frankenthaler (1928–2011): Elberta, 1975. Acrylic on canvas, 79 x 97 inches. Private Collection. © Helen Frankenthaler Foundation, Inc. / Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York.

Lee Krasner (American, Abstract Expressionism, 1908-1984). Untitled, 1948. Oil on pressed wood. 18 x 38 inches (45.7 x 96.5 cm). The Jewish Museum, New York. © The Pollock-Krasner Foundation/Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York.

Lee Krasner (1908-1984): Untitled, 1948. Oil on pressed wood, 18 x 38 inches (45.7 x 96.5 cm). The Jewish Museum, New York. © The Pollock-Krasner Foundation/Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York.

Helen Frankenthaler (American; Abstract Expressionism, Lyrical Abstraction; 1928 –2011): Nature Abhors a Vacuum, 1973. Acrylic on canvas, 103-1/2 x 112-1/2 inches  (262.9 x 285.8 cm). National Gallery of Art, Washington, D.C., USA. Image: Helen Frankenthaler Foundation. © Helen Frankenthaler Foundation, Inc.  “My pictures are full of climates, abstract climates. They're not nature per se, but a feeling.” (Helen Frankenthaler)

Helen Frankenthaler (1928–2011): Nature Abhors a Vacuum, 1973. Acrylic on canvas, 103-1/2 x 112-1/2 inches (262.9 x 285.8 cm). National Gallery of Art, Washington, D.C., USA. Image: Helen Frankenthaler Foundation. © Helen Frankenthaler Foundation, Inc.

Perle Fine (American, 1905–1988): Child's Play, 1973. Watercolor on paper, 19-3/8 x 22-1/2 inches (49.2 × 57.2 cm). Berry Campbell Gallery, New York, NY, USA. © Perle Fine. © AE Artworks, LLC.

Perle Fine (1905–1988): Child’s Play, 1973. Watercolor on paper, 19-3/8 x 22-1/2 inches (49.2 × 57.2 cm). Berry Campbell Gallery, New York, NY, USA. © Perle Fine. © AE Artworks, LLC.

Joan Mitchell (American, 1926-1992): Bracket, 1989. Oil on canvas (triptych), 102-1/2 x 181-3/4 inches (260.35 x 461.35 cm). The Doris and Donald Fisher Collection at the San Francisco Museum of Modern Art. © Estate of Joan Mitchell. Photo: Ian Reeves.

Joan Mitchell (1926-1992): Bracket, 1989. Oil on canvas (triptych), 102-1/2 x 181-3/4 inches (260.35 x 461.35 cm). The Doris and Donald Fisher Collection at the San Francisco Museum of Modern Art. © Estate of Joan Mitchell. Photo: Ian Reeves.

Perle Fine (1905–1988): Summer I, 1958-1959. Oil and collage on canvas, 57 x 70 inches (144.8 x 177.8 cm). McCormick Gallery, Chicago, Illinois, USA. © Perle Fine. Image: McCormick Gallery, Chicago, © AE Artworks, LLC.

Perle Fine (American, 1905–1988): Summer I, 1958-1959. Oil and collage on canvas, 57 x 70 inches (144.8 x 177.8 cm). McCormick Gallery, Chicago, Illinois, USA. © Perle Fine. Image: McCormick Gallery, Chicago, © AE Artworks, LLC.


© 2016 I Require Art Studios, LLC. All Rights Reserved.

African Mask & Sculpture Influence upon Modernism (slideshow) — Related: “Disguise: Masks & Global African Art,” Brooklyn Museum, through September 18th

Pablo Picasso (Spanish, 1881–1973): Les Demoiselles d’Avignon, 1907. Oil on canvas, 8′ x 7′ 8″ (243.9 x 233.7 cm). Museum of Modern Art, New York, NY, USA.

Related Exhibition: “Disguise: Masks & Global African Art”
April 29 — September 18, 2016
Brooklyn Museum, NY

Among the European avant-garde in the late 19th and early 20th centuries, there was a search for the “primitive” in art. The benchmark Armory Show of 1913 introduced the exoticism of African art. Adaptations of the shapes, contours and lines of African masks and sculptures quickly found their way into the new modernism styles. Premier among these works: Picasso’s Les Demoiselles d’Avignon, Paris, 1907.

Why masks? Maybe it is the simple mystery of it. Or perhaps it is an association with the mask’s original purpose, that of disguising a personal identity so to function as a direct conduit to the transcendent — or to magic. Or is it the symbolism of that which is ideal, beyond imperfection and thus more potent?

Currently showing through September 18th at the Brooklyn Museum, NY, is a closely related show: Disguise: Masks & Global African Art. The exhibition highlights contemporary works with historical African objects from the collections of the Seattle Art Museum and the Brooklyn Museum “within an immersive and lively installation of video, digital, sound, and installation art, as well as photography and sculpture.”* The romance, adaptation and influence of African art is happily still strong, vital, powerful.

— Jules Cavanaugh

* Press Release, Brooklyn Museum, NY


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