And through the window, blue air, love…

Marc Chagall: Evening at the Window, 1950. Oil on canvas. Sammlung Rosengart Art Museum, Lucerne, Switzerland.

“I had only to open my bedroom window, and blue air, love, and flowers entered with her.” (Marc Chagall)

Banksy (United Kingdom-based; graffiti artist, street art, political activist, film director, and painter): "Waiting in vain...at the door of the club" (Man with Flowers), 2013. Seen on a roll-down security gate covering the main entrance to Larry Flint's Hustler Club in Hell's Kitchen, New York, NY.

Banksy (United Kingdom-based; graffiti artist, street art, political activist, film director, and painter): “Waiting in vain…at the door of the club” (Man with Flowers), 2013. Seen on a roll-down security gate covering the main entrance to Larry Flint’s Hustler Club in Hell’s Kitchen, New York, NY.

 

Cy Twombly (American, Contemporary, 1928–2011): Wilder Shores of Love, Bassano in Teverina, 1985, Oil based house paint, oil crayon, coloured pencil, lead pencil on wooden panel, 55-1/8 x 47-1/4 inches (140 x 120 cm), Private Collection. © Cy Twombly, Walther Dräyer, Zürich. © This artwork may be protected by copyright. It is posted on the site in accordance with fair use principles.

Cy Twombly (American, Contemporary, 1928–2011): Wilder Shores of Love, Bassano in Teverina, 1985, Oil based house paint, oil crayon, coloured pencil, lead pencil on wooden panel, 55-1/8 x 47-1/4 inches (140 x 120 cm), Private Collection. © Cy Twombly, Walther Dräyer, Zürich. © This artwork may be protected by copyright. It is posted on the site in accordance with fair use principles.

 

Wassily Kandinsky (Russian, 1866-1944): Romantic landscape, 1911. Oil on canvas, 94.3 x 129 cm. Städtische Galerie im Lenbachhaus, Munich, Germany. "The true work of art is born from the Artist: a mysterious, enigmatic, and mystical creation. It detaches itself from him, it acquires an autonomous life, becomes a personality, an independent subject, animated with a spiritual breath, the living subject of a real existence of being." (Wassily Kandinsky)

Wassily Kandinsky (Russian, 1866-1944): Romantic landscape, 1911. Oil on canvas, 94.3 x 129 cm. Städtische Galerie im Lenbachhaus, Munich, Germany.
“The true work of art is born from the Artist: a mysterious, enigmatic, and mystical creation. It detaches itself from him, it acquires an autonomous life, becomes a personality, an independent subject, animated with a spiritual breath, the living subject of a real existence of being.” (Wassily Kandinsky)

 

M.C. Escher (Dutch, 1898-1972): Bond of Union, 1956. Lithograph, 25.3 x 33.9 cm (10 x 13-3/8 inches). © This artwork may be protected by copyright. It is posted on the site in accordance with fair use principles.

M.C. Escher (Dutch, 1898-1972): Bond of Union, 1956. Lithograph, 25.3 x 33.9 cm (10 x 13-3/8 inches). © This artwork may be protected by copyright. It is posted on the site in accordance with fair use principles.

 

Marc Chagall [French, born Russia (present-day Belarus), 1887-1985]: Over the Town, 1918. Oil on canvas, 45 x 56 cm. The State Tretyakov Gallery, Moscow, Russia. 'In his painting Over the City, Chagal and his wife Bella appear to be flying over Vitebsk while leaving in the space of Earth’s gravity the little houses sinking to one side. The principle theme of Chagal’s work is “the time of man.” He understood this to mean “man and his recollections, his reflections as something at the same time both existing and visible. It is a single being. And I portray it.” Therefore, the place allotted to any of the personages does not need to follow any laws of logic or physics and the figurative world loses its self-sufficiency and becomes only a pretext for expressing experiences. His ability to combine the lofty with the ordinary was one of the specific qualities of Chagal’s art. Even when depicting two lovers hovering over the city and daily life, the artist does not forget about details. Bella’s slippers, the lace of her dress, the very prosaic scene from life – all of this does not detract from the sense of the flight of these souls in love.' (© The State Tretyakov Gallery)

Marc Chagall [French, born Russia (present-day Belarus), 1887-1985]: Over the Town, 1918. Oil on canvas, 45 x 56 cm. The State Tretyakov Gallery, Moscow, Russia.

Tom Wesselmann (American, Pop Art, 1931-2004): Bedroom Painting No. 38, 1978, Oil on canvas, 213.36 x 246.38 cm, Hirshhorn Museum and Sculpture Garden Washington, D.C., USA. © Estate of Tom Wesselmann/SODRAC, Montreal/VAGA, New York (2012), Photo: Lee Stalsworth. © This artwork may be protected by copyright. It is posted on the site in accordance with fair use principles.

Tom Wesselmann (American, Pop Art, 1931-2004): Bedroom Painting No. 38, 1978. Oil on canvas, 213.36 x 246.38 cm, Hirshhorn Museum and Sculpture Garden Washington, D.C., USA. © Estate of Tom Wesselmann/SODRAC, Montreal/VAGA, New York (2012), Photo: Lee Stalsworth. © This artwork may be protected by copyright. It is posted on the site in accordance with fair use principles.

 

Alex Colville (Canadian; Realism, Magic Realism; 1920 - 2013): Soldier and Girl at Station, 1953. Glazed tempera on hardboard, 40.6 x 60.9 cm. The Thomson Collection, Art Gallery of Ontario, Toronto, Ontario, Canada. © This artwork may be protected by copyright. It is posted on the site in accordance with fair use principles.

Alex Colville (Canadian; Realism, Magic Realism; 1920 – 2013): Soldier and Girl at Station, 1953. Glazed tempera on hardboard, 40.6 x 60.9 cm. The Thomson Collection, Art Gallery of Ontario, Toronto, Ontario, Canada. © This artwork may be protected by copyright. It is posted on the site in accordance with fair use principles.

 

 

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